De’Thell

De'Thell

Population: 70,997
Official Language: De’Noian Vak
Climate: Tropical
Dominant Magic Form: Sympathetic Magic

 

The De’Noi Isles are made up of three distinct islands and four small, uninhabited, atolls. A long reef commonly referred to as “The Boundary” runs along the southern edge of the Isles territory, making them dangerous to access for inexperienced sailors. The largest island, De’Thell, features a coastline formed mainly of high cliffs with one safe bay in the centre of the southern coast. Here you can find the city of De’Thell, the largest city and default capital of the Isles.

De’Thell, like the rest of the Isles, has a colourful history of piracy and invasion, along with several civil uprisings. Now peaceful, the population remains a reflection of this diverse background, and the modern Isles have become something of a melting pot of the neighbouring cultures of Verlese, Ara, and Thraet.

Despite this, De’Thell has developed some distinct local traditions, including a unique cuisine based off of the local and abundant seafood. In spite of their small landmass the locals are capable of sustaining themselves and their eclectic culture on little more than the sea around them.

Where to stay:

De’Noians have a strong familial tradition, and a majority of visitors to the Isles are returning family members who naturally stay with their relatives. For those of us without local family or friends to put us up the accommodation choices are limited. The largest and most popular option is the Royal Mews, a sizable hotel in the centre of town. Converted from a former Palace out-building, the Mews cater to the majority of international travelers.
For somewhere with a little more local flavour you can stay at the Watchtower Inn. Built just behind the western watchtower at the end of the harbour wall, the owners and staff at the Inn are dedicated to introducing foreigners to the De’Noian way of life.

What to do/eat/see:

  • Reef Diving – The waters of De’Noi are home to one of the world’s most spectacular reefs, and boats take divers out several times a day. The site of numerous ship wrecks, The Boundary boasts some of the best dive sites to explore sunken ships. Many of the wrecks have grown into the reef itself.
  • Reef Ruins – Also on the famous reefs, and notoriously difficult to access, are a series of carved stone ruins that pre-date recorded history yet defy the erosion of the sea. Shallow walls of smooth stone poke above the waves, sheltering large pools of becalmed water in the middle of the reef. No one knows who built these structures, or why, but since their discovery they’ve become a key tourist attraction for the Isles.
  • Ancient Fortifications – The Harbour Wall and its Watchtowers were once the city’s key defensive structures against frequent pirate attacks. Partially destroyed during the country’s last major conflict, these defenses remain standing as a physical reminder of a violent past.
  • Sailing – Sailing is the main sport of De’Noi, and boat races are held year round. Some of the more serious races have a strict selection criteria for participants, but others are open to all comers.
    For a less competitive day on the water you can hire a boat to take you around the scenic rocky coast while you sunbathe on deck.
  • The Outer Isles – The smaller Isles, De’Shen and De’Ra, do not offer overnight accommodation for the casual traveler. They do, however, make for a pleasant day trip. Small enough for an able hiker to cover in under a day, these smaller Isles offer their own twists on local customs and cuisine and are well worth getting to know.

How to get there:

Boats from Verlese, Thraet, and Ara travel to and from De’Noi on a loose weekly basis. For those with a tighter schedule, one must charter a private boat.